The Online Home For Dog Breeders

Featuring Dog Breeders, Puppies For Sale, and Dog Breeds

Bookmark and Share


Support Dog
Health Testing
For Healthier Puppies
QualityDogs.com is your home for puppies, dog breeders, and dog health information. If you are a dog lover who is interested in learning about dog breeds, researching dog breeders, or even finding a puppy to add to your home, you are in the right place. To find current puppies for sale by site members, or to search our entire dog breeders list by breed, click on the menu bar to the left. While you are here, don't forget to check our out informative Dog Articles section, and post your own pictures and comments on our Breed Profile pages!
Are you a responsible dog breeder? Click here to find out how to join QualityDogs.com and appear on the site!
Latest Blog Entries
New Blog
Posted 2/6/2016
Just starting the new blog of Josie/Wally puppies. Pups were born on 12/21/15 and will be ready to go in 8 weeks. Let me know what you want to see in the blog; what you want to know about the puppies; what you would like to see of the sire and the dam. Thank you for your interest in our litter. ...
More

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)

Progressive Retinal Atrophy is a group of eye diseases of the retina, which lead to blindness. It has actually become a bit of a catch-all term for a variety of conditions, each with different specific mechanisms, affecting different breeds at different ages, but the common factor is the blindness that ultimately results from the diseased retina.

A brief discussion of the function of the retina will help in understanding PRA and its various forms. The retina is the innermost layer of the back of the eye, and it contains the cells that are sensitive to light ("photoreceptors") and the nerves structures that run from those cells through the optic nerve and, ultimately, to the brain. There are two types of photoreceptors: rods, which function in dim light, detect shape and motion, do not differentiate color, and are more concentrated around the perimeter of the retina; and cones, which function in brighter light, detect color, and are more concentrated in the central area of the retina.

The two major categories of retinal diseases typically grouped under Progressive Retinal Atrophy are (1) retinal dysplasia, where the key cells of the retina do not develop properly in the first eight weeks of life, and (2) retinal degeneration, where the cells do develop normally in the fetus and early puppyhood, but degenerate later in life. Additionally, some forms of PRA may affect only the rod cells or only the cone cells of the retina.
-Read the whole article
Read on! Check out:   Dog Health   |   Dog Nutrition   |   Training   |   Grooming   |   more articles
Recent Visitor Comments
Glen of Imaal Terrier
Recently we rescued of Glen of Imaal from our local SPCA. She is 4 yrs old and is a very focused little girl. A mind of her own, not real affectionate, but very loyal at the same time. She has trained me well.

Akita
I've owned 2 male Akitas. They've both been very healthy, low maintenance, friendly to humans, have lived with other pets but are NOT good with other males. Don't require a great deal of exercise.. A walk twice a day is plenty. Mine chew ice cubes after a walk. Neither of them showed any real interest in chewing anything else, but this has proven to keep their teeth and gums healthy and it's kind of funny, too. Can't sing their praises enough. Wonderful family membe

Coton de Tulear
My frenid Joan in My frenid Joan in Toronto was featured on Dogs With Jobs in Canada about 10 years ago. She hadÔĽŅ a standard poodle named Morgan as her narcolepsy service dog, and to our knowledge he was the first in the world. Joan now has Shaba as her service dog. Because the collapses in narcolepsy are actually paralysis (cataplexy) rather than sleep, Shaba's job is to drag her to a safe place when she's going to collapse, and stand over her and protect her while she's down. Was this

Post your comments in our Breed Profiles
Featured Puppy Announcements

Featured Breed -

Cane Corso

The Cane Corso At a Glance
Recognized By FCI
Country of Origin Italy
Life Expectancy 8 - 12 yrs
Height Range 22 - 27 in
Weight Range 80 - 135 lbs
Colors Black, lead-gray, slate, light gray, light fawn, deer fawn, dark fawn, brindle.
Trainability High
With Children Excellent when raised with them
With Animals Good if raised with them and socialized
Climate Any
Indoor/Outdoor Either
Exercise Reqd High; daily walks and plenty of play time
Grooming Reqd Low; occasional brushing
Cane Corso Information
The Cane Corso is a great guard dog, extremely loyal to its family and quite aloof with strangers. He has a very protective nature and yet is able to discern friend from foe. He instinctively knows when to become a terrifying, defensive and protective dog for its owner, his grounds, the house and the whole family. He should be submissive to his family and suspicious of strangers.

The Cane Corso is normally a quiet dog, barking only when alerted to a strange situation. Despite the breeds size they make excellent house dogs and are very athletic.

This breed needs socialization and as any large dog, owners should obedience train their dog. They get along well with children, protective yet gentle, seemingly aware of the childs helplessness and innocence. Their temperament is very stable. The Cane Corso devotedly loves his family.The Cane Corso requires a great deal of attention and training, so if your not prepared to make this commitment then maybe the Cane Corso is not the dog for you, also a person that doesn't have experience with a dominant dog. Corsos, especially males, can be very dominant and will challenge you for what he perceives to be leadership of the pack (your home and family). Considering there size and abilities itís best that a person who has experience with this type of behavior should own one.

The Cane Corso is an excellent guard dog, generally staying on his grounds. He has a strong sense of territory. The Cane Corso loves attention from his family, he is gentle with the children seemingly aware of there vulnerability. His look is bold and noble. The Corso until a few years ago was bred just for his working abilities. Keep in mind that these dogs are only off the farms since 1988. The Corso has a dominant nature especially towards other dogs. If he's raised with other dogs he should be fine with them. He should be socialized with other animals at an early age. The Corso will not run from a fight and will not back down from a challenge. Most Cane Corsos have a reserved nature towards strangers. Basically they have to get to know you before they become overly friendly towards you. This behavior is totally acceptable given this breeds history as a guard dog.

Socialization is a must for the Cane Corso. The best place to start is puppy kindergarten, you can start as early as 8 weeks. Your Corso will learn to interact with adults, children and other dogs, as well as learn basic obedience (sit, down, come and stay) Your kindergarten instructor will also be able to help you with problems you may be having with your puppy such as housebreaking, dominance and destructive chewing habits. Itís basically a good way for you an your puppy to get off on the right foot and have a successful relationship. Your vet should be able to recommend a school in your area. It is strongly recommended that obedience training become a permanent part of your Corsos life. It doesn't have to be in formal school but you should continue to work with the dog. This will serve to keep you established as the pack leader.

The Cane Corso bonds quickly to his family and becomes quite attached especially to the children. They enjoy being included in the family activities. Their high level of athleticism lends itself to include such activities as bike riding, swimming, long walks, jogging, or just playing fetch. It is not a good idea to get a Corso and just throw him in the yard and forget about him. He can handle the weather but what he can not handle is being isolated from his family. Corsos (dogs in general) are social animals and need companionship. To deprive them of that is cruel. Corsos make excellent house or apartment dogs however keep in mind the dog requires daily excercise. Ask your community leaders about dog runs or dog friendly parks. If there are none in your area a long walk or a little jogging should do nicely for both you and your dog.

The Cane Corso bonds quickly to his family and becomes quite attached especially to the children. They enjoy being included in the family activities. Their high level of athleticism lends itself to include such activities as bike riding, swimming, long walks, jogging, or just playing fetch. It is not a good idea to get a Corso and just throw him in the yard and forget about him. He can handle the weather but what he can not handle is being isolated from his family. Corsos (dogs in general) are social animals and need companionship. To deprive them of that is cruel. Corsos make excellent house or apartment dogs however keep in mind the dog requires daily excercise. Ask your community leaders about dog runs or dog friendly parks. If there are none in your area a long walk or a little jogging should do nicely for both you and your dog.

Courtesy of Villagio Cane Corsos
Click to find:   Cane Corso Puppies For Sale   |   Cane Corso Breeders   |   Cane Corso Information

Dog Question of the Week

Some answers to last week's question:
What is your dog's strangest trick?
This Week's Question:
What is your dog's strangest trick?
My dog Katie will go get the newspaper every morning and take it out of the plastic bag!
Mary Beth from Detroit, MI, USA
We have a dog named Benjamin, and he won't take his vitamin unless we put it on his nose for him to flip up and catch.
Walt from MA, USA
I have trained my dog to jump rope and he loves it. Now he won't let my daughter jump rope by herself.
Jean-Paul from Nice, FRA
We taught Twinkie to carry a purse! Her treats are in there and she won't open the purse herself... she waits for us to open it and give them to her!
Ben from New York, NY, USA
Our dog Skipper pretends to fall off the sofa. He did once by accident and we cuddled him afterward so he started doing it over and over for attention.
Rhonda from Boulder, CO, USA
My dog learned how to skateboard! Well, getting there, anyway. She can ride it and push, but still working on steering...
Barrett from Norcross, GA, USA
Dog Question of the Week
What is your dog's strangest trick?
Your first name
Your city
State/province
Country
 
By submitting, you grant QualityDogs.com the right to publish your submission (including your name/location if supplied) on this or affiliated websites, and to edit your submission for content, spelling, and/or grammar.
Google+