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Latest Blog Entries
Mini Schnauzers
Posted 7/29/2014
Eyes and ears are now open. We just turned 2 weeks and have complete our early neuro stimulation exercises. Next will be working on our walking. ...
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Distichiasis - Eyelashes Gone Awry

Distichiasis is the presence of distichiae, which are abnormal hairs growing from the edge of the eyelid. These hairs grow from oil glands, called Meibomian glands, which are normal and present in dogs' eyelids, and open onto the edge of the eyelid. If the hair grows out of the opening and protrudes at the eyelid edge, it is called a distichia; if it grows out through the eyelid's inner surface, effectively pointed toward the eyeball, it is called Ectopic Cilia. Dogs with disthichiasis typically have multiple occurrences on both eyes.

Symptoms of Distichiasis
There may be no symptoms at all, if the hairs are very fine and don't point inward. However, if the hairs are angled or curled inward, and/or are not as fine, then they may cause irritation of the cornea. Symptoms would include squinting, signs of discomfort, and possible gummy discharge. If the case is more severe, the dog may develop a corneal ulceration, which would show as a bluish-gray discoloration on the eye surface, possibly with a visibile indention if very severe, and the dog may be so uncomforable that he injures himself trying to scratch or rub his eye. -Read the whole article
Read on! Check out:   Dog Health   |   Dog Nutrition   |   Training   |   Grooming   |   more articles
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My frenid Joan in My frenid Joan in Toronto was featured on Dogs With Jobs in Canada about 10 years ago. She had´╗┐ a standard poodle named Morgan as her narcolepsy service dog, and to our knowledge he was the first in the world. Joan now has Shaba as her service dog. Because the collapses in narcolepsy are actually paralysis (cataplexy) rather than sleep, Shaba's job is to drag her to a safe place when she's going to collapse, and stand over her and protect her while she's down. Was this

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Featured Puppy Announcements

Featured Breed -

Chinese Shar-Pei

The Chinese Shar-Pei At a Glance
Recognized By AKC
Country of Origin China
Life Expectancy 9 - 11 yrs
Height Range 18 - 20 in
Weight Range 35 - 60 lbs
Colors Any solid
Trainability Easy, but can be stubborn
With Children Excellent
With Animals Depends; should be raised with them
Climate Any
Indoor/Outdoor Indoor
Exercise Reqd Not much
Grooming Reqd Little; care for skin folds
Chinese Shar-Pei Information
The Chinese Shar-Pei has been in the United States since 1972. For over 20 years, it was commonly over-bred with little concern for its genetic weaknesses and indiscriminantly sold to whomever had enough money. The results were disastrous. Today's reputable breeders are waging a relentless battle to reduce those inherited problems, like skin conditions, kidney failure, hip and knee defects, entropion, cancer, and blindness. Even though questionable temperaments seem to be an issue of the past, the drawbacks of owning a Shar-Pei still exist unless buyers do their homework and research not only the breed but the person they buy it from.



Since being recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1992, the Chinese Shar-Pei stands proud in show rings from coast to coast, but in some cases, that too has had a negative effect on this breed's welfare. When breeders only concentrate on what will win in the ring, health issues can take a back seat to breed type. Therefore, when selecting a Shar-Pei, it is important to remember that titles alone do not guarantee good health. Only responsible, researched breeding against health problems will contribute to the improvement of the breed's health and help to insure healthy individual dogs. But regardless of all this, the breed has endured in the last 30+ years. The Shar-Pei remains unique, fun, and endearing from pupyhood to senior citizen status. Quality breeders are bringing health back to this fascinating breed, and choosing a breeder wisely will help contribute to the overall well-being of the Shar-Pei.



Contributed by Ellana Clarke, www.chi-kuan-sharpei.com
Click to find:   Chinese Shar-Pei Puppies For Sale   |   Chinese Shar-Pei Breeders   |   Chinese Shar-Pei Information

Dog Question of the Week

Some answers to last week's question:
What is your dog's strangest trick?
This Week's Question:
What breed do you think makes the best companion, and why?
My dog Katie will go get the newspaper every morning and take it out of the plastic bag!
Mary Beth from Detroit, MI, USA
We have a dog named Benjamin, and he won't take his vitamin unless we put it on his nose for him to flip up and catch.
Walt from MA, USA
I have trained my dog to jump rope and he loves it. Now he won't let my daughter jump rope by herself.
Jean-Paul from Nice, FRA
We taught Twinkie to carry a purse! Her treats are in there and she won't open the purse herself... she waits for us to open it and give them to her!
Ben from New York, NY, USA
Our dog Skipper pretends to fall off the sofa. He did once by accident and we cuddled him afterward so he started doing it over and over for attention.
Rhonda from Boulder, CO, USA
My dog learned how to skateboard! Well, getting there, anyway. She can ride it and push, but still working on steering...
Barrett from Norcross, GA, USA
Dog Question of the Week
What breed do you think makes the best companion, and why?
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