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Phosphofructokinase (PFK) Deficiency

Phosphofructokinase Deficiency, commonly called PFK Deficiency (or sometimes less accurately called just "PFK"), is an inherited disorder where an essential enzyme, phosphofructokinase, is deficient. This enzyme, PFK for short, is critical in the conversion of glucose to energy, particularly in red blood cells and muscle cells. Dogs who are deficient in PFK will have muscle and red blood cells that cannot supply their own energy needs, which becomes most apparent in times of stress or heavy exercise. Much of the time, during levels of low stress and exercise, they will have a lower-than-normal level of red blood cells ("persistent mild anemia"), which may not be as readily apparent and may not exhibit any visible symptoms. It is in times of stress and exercise that the condition would become obvious and likely demand veterinary attention.

Symptoms of Phosphofructokinase Deficiency
Most of the symptoms would appear after stress, exercise, heat, or excessive barking, and they include tiredness, weakness, apparent muscle cramps, pale gums, and high fever. One symptom that is often the identifying factor of the disease is dark-colored urine, caused by the breakdown of blood products.
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Read on! Check out:   Dog Health   |   Dog Nutrition   |   Training   |   Grooming   |   more articles
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Featured Breed -

Bulldog

The Bulldog At a Glance
Recognized By AKC, CanKC, UKC, CKC, KCUK, FCI, AFDSB
Country of Origin Great Britain
Life Expectancy 10 yrs
Height Range 12 - 15 in
Weight Range 45 - 55 lbs
Colors White; Fawn; Red; Red
Brindle; Any above with
White markings; Piebald
(predominantly white)
Trainability Medium. Very attentive, but would rather learn what they can get away with.
With Children Excellent. Loves to play but not demanding.
With Animals Good except at feeding time.
Climate Suffers in heat
Indoor/Outdoor Predominantly Indoor
Exercise Reqd Low. Lazy.
Grooming Reqd Generally low, but requires ear, wrinkle, and dental care.
Bulldog Information
One of the most distinctive breeds in appearance, the Bulldog has changed dramatically over the years. Originally bred for bull- and bear-baiting, their origins have defined much of their appearance. Their strong jaws and short muzzle were perfect for hanging tenaciously onto a bull, and their front-heavy weight distribution and short back made it difficult for the bull to shake them. Although today's Bulldog retains many of those physical characteristics, the personality of the modern Bulldog is completely different. They are loving, gentle dogs who live for human attention but demand very little. They love to play, but rarely initiate it. Their docile, tolerant, and attentive nature makes them excellent with children, although older Bulldog puppies can be a little too playfully strong and clumsy for toddlers. As adults, they're more careful and passive about play, but they never completely grow up.

It is a widely-held misconception that Bulldogs are not very intelligent. In general, they are actually highly intelligent dogs who want to play, cuddle, or have their tummies rubbed, rather than learn some obedience trick. However, if you can keep it fun, they can learn the basic commands. Their true intelligence, though, is more subtle. They are masters at figuring things out... most especially figuring out how to get their way. In fact, they often think 'no' means 'wait until I'm not looking;' they are great at making you think they can't reach the table, or the bed... until you're not looking; and if all else fails, they're masters of the guilt trip. They seem to know that the sad, pouty face and the carefully-placed sigh can get them most anything. They truly have a human-like quality, and their feelings are easily hurt. But they're quick to forgive, especially with a treat and a hug!

The Bulldog is not a demanding breed by nature, but they do require a family to have a strong knowledge of the breed and its healthcare requirements. If you aren't willing to commit to possible frequent vet visits, then a Bulldog isn't for you. The breed is essentially man-made, and they have been bred for specific physical traits. Unlike most breeds, where nature has shaped their physical characteristics to fit their function and their environment, Bulldogs aren't built for thriving in any natural environment. So before welcoming a Bulldog into your home, the first step is to become knowledgeable about the breed, and the second step is to find a vet that is experienced with Bulldogs. That is not to say that Bullies can't be healthy... they simply rely on you to keep them healthy, and to care for them in general. One critical note: Anesthetizing any dog has its risks, but with Bulldogs, it is very serious. Because of their unusual airways and difficulty breathing, the muscle relaxation that comes with anesthesia can easily cause their airway to collapse. Sadly, many Bullies have been lost in simple, non-emergency procedures that involved anesthesia. That is but one reason for finding a vet that is very experienced with the breed. It is also a reason that breeding is undertaken by only the most knowledgeable, experienced, and committed families... over 90 percent of litters are born via Caeserian section, and care of the newborn puppies is extremely difficult.

Overall, the Bulldog can be a wonderful addition to your family, if you are willing to commit the time to learn about the breed and provide the proper health care. Equally importantly, they need your time, companionship, and love. In return, you will get unconditional affection (except for the occasional pouting) and a delightful, often comical friend.

Quote from the Bulldog Mind: 'I'm not a dog, I'm a Person!... only shorter.'
Click to find:   Bulldog Puppies For Sale   |   Bulldog Breeders   |   Bulldog Information

Dog Question of the Week

Some answers to last week's question:
What's the coolest dog name you ever heard?
This Week's Question:
Do you think dogs can read our emotions?
We met a couple at the pet supply store who's dog was named ""Ed."" You know a dog named Ed is gonna be cool!
Ed from Ft Worth, TX, USA
I think the coolest dog name EVER is ""Strudel."" Probably has to be a German dog, though, like a German Shepherd.
Callie from Ann Arbor, MI, USA
I have heard some good ones over the years but I rather like my own. Three of them are Veruca, Sweeney (Todd) and Ellen Degeneres.
Jessica from Hawley, PA, USA
Riverstead's Mad Dog Skull Cap ""Deogie pronounced D.O.G.
Anonymous from Halifax, Nova Scotia, CAN
biscuit
allan from bangalore, karnataka, India
Dog Question of the Week
Do you think dogs can read our emotions?
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